Use More Weight For One-Arm Dumbbell Rows

The One-Arm Dumbbell Row is one of the best back-building exercises you can do.

If you knew of a way to be able to not only perform it with heavier weight but in a far safer manner for your lower back, would you be interested?

I have just what you're looking for: a simple body-positioning trick that will INSTANTLY allow you to use much heavier weight with good form without compromising the health of your lower back.

The typical one-arm dumbbell row is done on a bench with one knee placed on the end, one hand set forward on the bench to brace the upper body and the other foot planted solidly beside the bench. The lower back should be arched and tight and the head should be looking somewhat up and forward.

This position is absolutely fine for the back and body when you are in it without weight. Now let's add a dumbbell and see what happens.

Generally, you are taught to hold the dumbbell in your hand, let it stretch forward a little then bring it up along the outside of your thigh and up towards your hip. Nothing wrong with that, right?

Wrong!

Bringing the dumbbell up along the outside of your thigh can not only greatly limit the amount of weight you're able to use safely for this exercise, it can also compromise the safety of your lower back. The technique I'm about to show you will TOTALLY eliminate these problems, making the exercise safer and making your immediately stronger in it.

 

Change How You Row

What's the technique?

Instead of placing your foot beside the bench and bringing the dumbbell up along the outside of your thigh, set your foot out wide to the side and bring the dumbbell up along the INSIDE of your thigh (your knee should be slightly bent when you do this).

It doesn't sound earth-shattering but you'll notice an IMMEDIATE difference in how the exercise feels. You will feel stronger and more stable right away.

Here's the regular One Arm Row position.

Regular One Arm Row Position

Note how the dumbbell is held on the outside of the leg. This places it outside of your base of support for the exercise.

This is the optimized One Arm Row position.

Optimized One Arm Row Position

Note how the leg is now set off to the side. This places the dumbbell inside your base of support, dramatically increasing your stability and allowing you to use much more weight safely.

 

When you examine the standard performance of this exercise, you'll see one glaring problem...

The resistance is placed entirely OUTSIDE of your base of support during the movement. Your base of support is formed by your legs and your arm on the bench. When the resistance is outside of your base of support, i.e. the dumbbell coming up the outside of your thigh, your body must attempt to counterbalance this torque with your lower back.

When you're using lighter weights, it doesn't matter so much as the resistance is not enough to really cause problems.

One Arm Dumbell Rows

Imagine, however, trying to do a one-arm dumbbell row with a dumbbell that weighs almost as much as you do. Think you'll be able to hold that outside your thigh and not fall over or severely injure your back?

By setting your foot out wide (like an angled brace holding up a retaining wall), you immediately widen your base of support, making yourself far more stable and increasing your power.

One Arm Dumbell Rows

Bringing the resistance up INSIDE of your base of support allows you to instantly use much heavier weight without the dangerous, unbalanced torque on your lower back and body.

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Using this technique allowed me to perform 3 reps (with good form) with a home-made 210 pound dumbbell. This dumbbell weighed 20 pounds more than I did at the time.

When you try this technique and are able to starting moving heavier weights, be absolutely sure you keep a tight arch in your lower back. DO NOT allow it to round over at all. Rounding your lower back not only decreases the effect of the exercise on the lats, it also immediately relaxes the muscles of the spine that work to stabilize the spine.

The result: possible immediate injury. Keep it arched and keep it tight.

Give this positioning technique a try in your next back workout. You will notice an immediate difference in how the exercise feels and realize an immediate increase in the amount of weight you are able to handle with it.

Learn the full technique for performing One-Arm Dumbbell Rows here.

 

 


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